Instructions for Post Operative Care

If you have questions about your child’s care after his/her dental visit, please choose one of the links below, or contact our office at (203)264-1497.

Care of the Mouth after Local Anesthetic
Care of the Mouth after Trauma
Care of the Mouth after Extractions
Bleeding
Oral Discomfort after a Cleaning
Pain
Care of Sealants


Care of the Mouth after Local Anesthetic (Sleepy Juice)
If your child has had local anesthetic for a dental procedure, there may possibly be numbness remaining post treatment. If the anesthesia was given in the upper jaw or roof of the mouth, most likely the teeth, lip and surrounding tissues of that specific area will be numb. If the anesthetic was given in the lower jaw, the teeth, lip and tongue, along with the other surrounding tissues in that area may be asleep.
Most often, children do not understand the effects of local anesthesia, as it may not be a feeling they are used to. They may chew, bite, suck, or play with the numb lip, tongue, or cheek. Some have a tendency to scratch the area on the face where the injection was placed in the mouth. These actions can at the very least cause minor irritations. Severe cases may include swelling and abrasions to the tissue or the face. Please monitor your child closely for approximately one to two hours following the appointment. It is wise to keep your child on a liquid or soft diet until the anesthetic has worn off, or if possible, to refrain from giving ANY food or drink until total feeling has returned.

Please do not hesitate to contact our office if you have any questions.

 

Care of the Mouth after Trauma

Please do not hesitate to contact our office if you have any questions.

 

Care of the Mouth after Extractions

Please do not hesitate to contact our office if you have any questions.

 

Bleeding

(++ Why a tea bag, you may ask? Black tea contains tannins. Tannins are astringent, bitter plant polyphenols that either bind and precipitate, or shrink proteins. The astringency from the tannins is what causes the dry and puckered feeling in the mouth following the consumption of red wine, strong tea, or an unripened fruit. Research shown suggests that tea from plant, Camellia Sinensis, is what should be used – not herbal teas.

The tannins contained in tea are useful for healing burns and stopping bleeding. Additionally, tannins stop infection while continuing to heal the wound internally. In the event an infection has already begun, tannins have the ability to form a protective layer over the exposed tissue to stop the infection from spreading. What is even more amazing is that tea bags can be used for more than tooth extractions. You may also use tea bags to control bleeding that occurs as the result of injuries to the soft tissues, which include the tongue, cheeks, gums and lips.)

Please do not hesitate to contact our office if you have any questions.

 

Oral Discomfort after a Cleaning
A thorough cleaning can unavoidably produce some bleeding and irritation, depending on the child’s hygiene and home care. Some tenderness or discomfort may be present post treatment.  This is not due to a "rough cleaning" by the hygienist or the dentist, but to tender and inflamed gum tissue resulting from insufficient hygiene care at home. If your child is experiencing any discomfort afterwards, we recommend the following for 2-3 days after cleaning was performed:
1)  Utilizing a warm salt water rinse, 2 - 3 times per day.
    (1 teaspoon of salt in 1 cup of warm water, stir, use to gargle, then spit)
2)  Children's Tylenol, Advil, or Motrin as directed for the age or weight of the child.

Please do not hesitate to contact our office if the discomfort persists for more than a few days or if you have any questions.

 

Pain
For any discomfort, the use of Children's Tylenol, Advil, or Motrin (as directed for the age of the child) is acceptable.  If a pain medication was prescribed by the dentist post treatment, please follow the directions on the prescription.

Please do not hesitate to contact our office if you have any questions.

 

Care of Sealants
Used to fill in the pits and fissures of groovy teeth, sealants keep out plaque and food while decreasing staining of the rear adult molars, thus decreasing the risk of decay.  Since the sealant only covers the biting surface of the tooth, areas on the side and between teeth cannot be coated with the sealant.  Flossing is the only means capable of preventing cavities in between the teeth. Good oral hygiene, flossing and nutrition are all EQUALLY important in preventing dental decay.

Your child should refrain from chewing gum, or eating any sticky/gummy candy for a few days after the sealants are applied, as those types of candy may pull them out of the tooth’s grooves. We also recommend not chewing ice or hard candy, since these things also tend to fracture the sealants.  Regular dental appointments are recommended in order to be certain the sealants remain in place. If at your child’s dental visit, we notice any sealant we applied at our office has come off, we will replace them either at your visit (if time permits), or another time will be appointed to you, free of charge.

**The American Dental Association recognizes that sealants can play an important role in the prevention of tooth decay.  When properly applied and maintained, they can successfully protect the chewing surfaces of your child's teeth against dental decay.  A total prevention program includes: regular visits to the dentist, the use of topical fluoride (like in your toothpaste or the ACT fluoride rinse), daily brushing and flossing, and limiting the amount of sugary foods eaten on a daily basis.

If these measures are followed, in conjunction with sealants used on the child's teeth, the risk of decay can be significantly reduced, or possibly even eliminated!